The “One Day” outfit featuring The Afternoon Blouse

For a while now I’ve been complaining (in my head) about two things: I’m desparately lacking in nice blouses to wear, and I need some more plain skirts. I’m attracted to bright colours and patterns which sometimes mean that my wardrobe looks like a higgeldy mess of colours and I have to pick through everything to find things that match. I am quite happy mixing patterns but sometimes it just gets a bit much, you know?

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So we’ve established that I can’t say no to brights. I’m also not to good at buying blouse fabrics – no idea why, but I think part of it is that lots of patterns call for almost 2m, and I figure if I’m going to buy 2m (and the fabric is usually in some way expensive), I might as well get a WHOLE outfit out of it. I can get a bit stingy with fabric, so I’ve been trying to get hold of cute patterns that use not-so-much fabric and don’t have lots of details that I’m not ready to tackly in delicate blouse fabric.

The Afternoon Blouse by Jennifer Lauren Vintage (from Dunedin, NZ, where I went to university) kind of meets both of those criteria.

ImageAlthough the “required yardage” is about 1.5m, I used vastly less than that – I had a 140x60cm piece and a much smaller piece that I was able to just fit the facing onto, so you should easily be able to get it out of ~90cm. The fabric itself is a rayon from one of the members of the Wellington Sewing Bloggers Network (erm, I can’t quite remember who it was, sorry and thanks!). I’m not sure if it’s vintage or not, but it has a few small stains on it that look like the ones you get on vintage tablecloths. All I know is I snapped it up as soon as my beady eyes caught sight of it, and didn’t ask any questions.ImageThe fabric is looovely and drapey and feels really nice to wear, and I love how it blouses over the skirt. I feel like I’m wearing a vintage grandma blouse and I love it.

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This photo is for Mary – this was the first photo we took! It’s damn windy here…

The blouse was SO quick to make. I even timed myself, and it took 90 minutes all up. In terms of construction, I basically followed the instructions (mainly I just glanced at the diagrams). The inside seams are finished with the overlocker and the hem and sleeves are all finished with a narrow hem. For the facing, instead of fusing the interfacing on and then finishing the edges, I sewed right sides together (using the glue side as the wrong side), trimmed the seam with pinking shears, then turned and pressed the interfacing down. This gives the facing a really nice finish without any extra stitching.

ImageFor some reason the only good photos from today were crazy photos.

In case you’re wondering about the skirt; yep, I made that as well. In the same evening as the top. Hence the “one day outfit”.

It’s from the Gertie’s high waisted skirt (previously made here, here, here and here). When I tried it on halfway through I decided I wanted it to be a bit more pegged than my other versions, so I took it in at the bottom of the side seams, and the bottom center back seam. BIG MISTAKE. I think that really needs to be a flat-pattern adjustment, because I can feel some weird pulling around the bottom. I was also left with a much shorter vent, which combined with the peggings makes it VERY difficult to get on (getting dressed may remind my husband of my pantihose dance). I also got some excess pooling at the bum:

ImageThis photo makes me wonder if there’s a fitting issue that needs fixing at the hips on my sloper, or if it’s just because I changed the bottom of the skirt. It’s not tooo bad but I do end up tugging it a bit during the day (and apologies about the wrinkles, I can only take photos after work and I do a lot of sitting-to-standing and back).

ImageI decided to straighten out the waistband, rather than using the curved one that I’ve done with all my other versions.

ImageI did an invisible hem and decided that it’s not the best idea on a vented skirt – at least, if you’re going to do it, do it before you sew up the center back seam! So it’s not the greatest black skirt, but it’ll do and I always have to remind myself that it still fits better than ready-to-wear.

ImageWhat am I doing here?

I actually really like the blouse – the funny fold-over front is cute although I will need to sort out some way to make it stay in place (it’ll help when I have hand-needles…I had to sew the waistband button with a sewing machine needle). It uses very little fabric and is quick, and the kimono sleeves give it a classy/casual look. I may use this pattern to make a plain v-neck kimono blouse for even more versions.

The black skirt I’m 50% happy about – I will wear it a lot because it’s so plain it will go with anything else in my wardrobe (and is one of only 4 black items in my whole place), but the fit is a bit off.

Details

Patterns: The Afternoon Blouse by Jennifer Lauren Vintage, $14 NZD, and Gertie’s high waisted skirt

Fabric: Black stretch cotton twill, $8,60 and rayon, free

Notions: Pale blue button and white and gold button (skirt), zip, thread and interfacing all from stash. Thread, $4

Total: $26.60 all up

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13 thoughts on “The “One Day” outfit featuring The Afternoon Blouse

    • It would! It looks o-kay on me tucked in. That is, no blouse (without darts) looks that good untucked but this is the best one I’ve tried.
      Jeans are hopefully on their way, too – I have all the materials ready, I’m just really nervous to start because I want them to work sooo bad

  1. So lovely! I want to try this look out for myself so I should keep an eye out for pretty fabric… Not that I need more! I wonder if pegging it at the c.b is what is causing it to ride up at the butt? Regardless you look fab! You’re giving me pencil skirt feevah!

    • My fabric stash here is dwindling quickly – looking forward to that wool! And I’m going to have to go fabric shopping when I get back to the city “oh no”.

      It’s definitely the pegging that did it – because I did it on an almost-finished garment I wouldn’t have taken fabric out of the whole length, so the bum bits stays saggy while the knee bit hugs the legs

  2. Both garments are great, and look lovely on you.

    Re the pegging, I think it was the CB alteration that did it. I’ve pegged already-made skirts several times on the side seams with no issues, but have always left the cb as is. I do it by putting the garment on, pinning the hip apex, then tapering it gently from that point to the hem.

    I also desperately need new blouses/tops – that’s going to be my focus if I get my sewjo back anytime soon!

      • I’m not an expert, but my thougths woudl be to avoid messing with the cb at the hem, I would think that pegging the cb would change the way the back of the skirt hangs. The cb is your balance line and taking a wedge out there would make the sides angle in from the edge to under your bum. You don’t need to peg much to get a tapered shape, I think my mine were about 6cm each side at the hem (so 24cm total reduction), and from the hip that was a really gentle taper.

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